Work

Welcome To Faketasy-Land

In this series Tscherner aims to wrestle back some sense of tranquility, calm and peace from the pervasive scream of advertisings` incessant omnipresence; replacing its branded pornography with her own photography she quietly asks, what is sacred now?

Can a lifetimes` collection of studied and well worn books or a neatly lined up row of expectant yoga mats become mere tropes for consumers searching for images portable on instagram to demand that the world know how wise we are, how well travelled, how studious, how devoted……..

By inserting her private observations into the public (imagined) space, we are able to reflect upon the faking of reality and question whether wisdom, devotion, and love can or should be bought or sold.

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

Text Natalie Press

 

Step Out Of Line

Step out of line. Stand up and plant a few trees.

Why do humans have the tendency to pigeonhole everything? Why does everything have to be strictly lined up? Where does order help, when does chaos get too much? The random principle isn’t determining any rules. On the contrary, a little bit of chaos hasn’t harmed anyone, just a little bit of disorder. And how does chaos and/or order relate to personal freedom? How long will it take us until we feel free to stand out and just leave our continuous urge to fit in and adapt behind?

These are the questions and topics with which this little, continually growing photo series deals.

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

 

Hear My Song

Inspired by legendary lyrics, visual artist and photographer Verena Tscherner turns her attention to seemingly inconspicuous everyday occurrences, reviving them in front of her camera. Just like that, it seems, plants growing through the asphalt become survival artists, left behind chairs become lovers, a lonely pencil drawing gains character, and even a drainpipe turns out to be many lively veins with colorful leaves flowing through them. Existing situations are embraced as they are; while situational comedy and tragedy often find themselves next to each other. Beneath the “bridge over troubled water” runs a smooth, shimmering mountain stream – whatever is hidden beneath the surface is left for us to imagine. The artist knows how to get her audience curious about the stories happening around us, all day, every day. Her view invites us to look around ourselves in the places where until now we wouldn’t have thought of spotting something extraordinary. Whoever engages with Tscherners imagery feels the immediate connection to life with all its ups and downs, or, to say it with Bill Withers’ words: “Sometimes in our lives we all have pain, we all have sorrow, but if we are wise, we know that there’s always tomorrow.”

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

Text Maria Salamon

 

Borders Create Abysses

Borders confine us. Borders restrict us. Our horizons, our thoughts. In this way, they create abysses. Just like the moat around a castle. Borders separate us from each other through this deep abyss they are creating. They limit and isolate ourselves, they ostracise the others. Every limiting object (walls, fences, railings, etc.) has a shadow. And these shadows are what symbolise the abysses created by the original object.

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

 

Single Works

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

 

Human Emoticons – Interactive photo exhibition

Developing on from emoticons, facial expressions made with punctuation marks, the emoji was created in 1998 by Shigetaka Kurita, an engineer at the Japanese phone company, NTT Docomo. He was interested in customers being free to communicate emotions using icons and says he drew his emojis from manga, Chinese characters and international bathroom signs. There now exist some 1,800 emojis to choose from.

As a devoted user of emojis herself Tscherner felt compelled to gather her friends around her and “make faces”, photographing the results as a gallery piece where everyone involved plus an audience would be invited to communicate, face to face, in real time, and to start a conversation about the objectification of feelings by taking a vote on which photograph corresponds correctly to which emoji.

As we are living witnesses to the very birth of this new millennial language that will inevitably become the age of the Avatar, Tscherner wants to ask, is it Good, Bad or Ugly….?

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

Text Natalie Press

 

It’s All Just A Matter Of Perspective

In this series of Diptychs, Tscherner focuses our attention on the concept of perception; the first image places the viewer inside a seemingly hopeless place, while the second image transports us to a space of luxurious comfort. The views outside are interrupted with their antidotes, playing with our notions of having and wanting, seeing and believing. A critique on the power of advertising and our culpability as consumers, this work allows us to think more deeply about our role in making our own decisions, to be hopeful in the darkness and to be wary of realities that are all too often blinded by the light.

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

Text Natalie Press

 

As A Matter Of Focus – Photo series

Background:
This series was inspired by an assignment from a photography textbook, which was all about using the focus more creatively. On several walks through urban spaces, I developed a heightened artistic awareness.

Concept:
This series is tied up to an earlier series called “It’s All Just A Matter Of Perspective” – “Alles eine Sache der Perspektive”. It was important to me to draw attention to messages, which were publicly present on much frequented sites but often don’t gain any conscious awareness (like – often politically motivated – stickers). To reverse or even break up the often restricted perception of daily live, the surroundings should remain unclear and blurred.

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

 

Go On, Throw Our Money Down The Drain

Presented in the form of election posters, each 80cm x 120cm large, sketched outlines of current political leaders are superimposed onto sites of public waste. This tension is heightened by the appearance of currency, a monetary coin made larger than life works as a symbolic reminder of the 2000-2005 coalition where questions regarding the national budget remain largely unanswered…… Tscherner here points to the dangers inherent in the new political climate urging the viewer to contemplate its implications for the economy as a whole.

 

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

Text Natalie Press

From Another Time – Photo series

Walks through inner-city disctrics are a preferred method to train the photographic eye. For me as an artist, the purpose of this series was to draw attention to the interplay between tradition and modernity. As such, this series contains pictures as metaphors for the interplay that constitutes itself in the cityscape. According to my opinion, there is often a simultaneity between traditional and modern elements in Austrian cities, whether be it architectural, infrastructural or recognisable in the urban landscape. The titles themselves are wordplays with nostalgic value referring to tv series, songs or phrases from childhood days.

To view a photo in its original size, click on the preview box 🙂 

 

All translations Gabriel Walter

Scroll to top